New Star Trek: One, not man….nothing is sacred

Great movie. Watched it last night. Maybe they have been doing this for awhile but I noted in the mission statement, “to boldly go where no man one has gone before.

Nothing is sacred.

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16 thoughts on “New Star Trek: One, not man….nothing is sacred

  1. You know, I didn’t even notice that subtle change. My husband didn’t mention it if he did. It’s a little disappointing.

  2. You’re just noticing this NOW?

    [I’m too old to have been in the Next Gen sweet spot, those years were spent raising little kids and not watching much TV….missed the whole dang thing]

  3. Greetings empathologism. Have you seen Iron Man 3 and Fast and the Furious 6? What do you think of them? Your advice?

    Iron Man 1 was politically correct, albeit watchable and with a good story. Iron Man 2 was horrendous in my opinion. What about Iron Man 3?

    I’m going to see Fast and the Furious 6. I’ve heard some great reviews, but I’m unsure.

  4. And no, nothing is sacred for these people, its twisted demonic religion, its habits and ideology, its culture and its politics. It’s all about power to them (and to it) and infecting everybody with some deadening virus.

    Even kid’s books aren’t safe. Watch out for kid books too.

  5. Iron man 3 was a good movie, it would be a spoiler to tell you how it was made politically correct and woman pandering…..but it was, big time. I like those movies almost universally because I was a comic collector from the late 60’s and 70’s, still have some choice editions in plastic collector sleeves.

  6. So Iron Man 3 was good but it was full of twisted chivalrous white knights? )=

  7. > The sequel will probably have: ‘To boldly go where no man is allowed’

    ROFLMAO!

    When they invented ST-Voyager, the first thing they did was hand a woman (Capt. Janeway) the keys to the starship — and she promptly got them lost on the other side of the galaxy 70,000 light years from home!

    It’s right up there w/Dorothy managing to get tornadoed into Oz in the Managing to Get Thoroughly and Completely and Hopelessly Lost – But Don’t Blame the Victim department.

    If they wanted to be socio-culturally relevant, that would be the salient series to focus on.

    “To pigheadedly and bumblingly go where no man is capable of getting us…”?

    Anyway, from what I understand the current movie is high on action but low on Star Trek-y-ness. People like empath may in fact be the audience the franchise has morphed into now being aimed at, as J.J. Abrams’ connection to any of the earlier TV series is tenuous. It’s like Alias and Lost getting fused with pieces off an old Star Trek set in some bizarre Hollywood transporter malfunction.

  8. Anything that exudes real masculine adventure and risk taking, that doesn’t include the ideal that a woman would be just as or more capable, is not allowed.

    Eh, even though Star Trek TNG was full of political correctness, I enjoyed them as a kid, they still hold a special place but the current constant and nauseating predisposition, that there is nothing good, honourable or unique about masculinity, that permeates every TV series or movie makes it extremely unlikely that I will actually purchase a movie ticket or boxed series set.

    The ending of the Iron man 3 movie insulted everything about the Ironman series for me. For those that have seen it they will probably understand why. The movie was fun to watch but the ending made the ideal of Ironman rather pointless.

  9. When they invented ST-Voyager, the first thing they did was hand a woman (Capt. Janeway) the keys to the starship — and she promptly got them lost on the other side of the galaxy 70,000 light years from home!

    It’s right up there w/Dorothy managing to get tornadoed into Oz in the Managing to Get Thoroughly and Completely and Hopelessly Lost – But Don’t Blame the Victim department.

    If you follow the narrative (as far as I can recollect), she gets back with the fortuitous help of the Borg after almost everything and everyone falls apart on the ship, doesn’t have to answer for any of what has happened, and promptly gets put into a position of Admiral, who is prominently featured (in things that occurred after the Voyager show was over) ordering around ship captains.

    The feminist dream come true.

  10. Different movie, empath but I thought you might find this interesting. Our family watched Brave recently. When it was over our 6 year-old asked a question: “Who was the villain in this movie? There’s usually a villain but not this time.”

    My husband told her, “There was a villain. The princess, Merida was the villain.” And he proceeded to explain to her why Merida was the villain.

    It was a teaching moment.

  11. “Anything that exudes real masculine adventure and risk taking, that doesn’t include the ideal that a woman would be just as or more capable, is not allowed. ”

    The Lord of the Rings series?

    Certainly there were elements of women trying to be men, but ultimately what was required for good to triumph was for a man (Aragorn) to take his rightful place and be who he was born to be.

  12. Just re-read what I posted previously and realized that it sound a lot like “men, step up”. That’s not what I meant and it’s not what I believe that message from LOTR means either. Aragorn’s avoiding of his true calling is not at all portrayed as a man choosing to slide by with minimum effort like the “men step up” crowd likes to portray today’s men. The reasons and fears and failures behind his choice to avoid his calling are explored.

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